RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS

The research groups of the Thomas Young Centre frequently publish important advances that are of interest to a wide multi-disciplinary audience. The items on our "Science Highlights" pages are short summaries of some of these advances, usually based on publications in high-impact journals.

Rigorous Bounds on the Heating Rate in Thue-Morse Quasiperiodically and Randomly Driven Quantum Many-Body Systems.jpg
30/07/2021

In the last decade researchers have realised that simply shaking a collection of quantum particles can give rise to new phases of matter without any counterparts in undriven equilibrium systems. However, most of these are rather delicate and require a strictly periodic shaking because otherwise the system would quickly absorb energy heating up to a boring featureless state.

Variational quantum algorithm with information sharing.jpg
22/07/2021

In this work we introduce a hybrid algorithm whose goal is to efficiently obtain multi-dimensional energy surfaces of physical systems with many degrees of freedom.

First-principles design of a single-atom–alloy propane dehydrogenation catalyst.jpg
25/06/2021

This work was part of a long-term collaboration between the groups of Charles Sykes (Tufts University), Angelos Michaelides (former TYC Director and Professor at UCL, now at the University of Cambridge) and Michail Stamatakis (UCL).

Notably, this collaboration was fostered at a TYC Soirée back in September 2012 and has led to significant advancements in our understanding of SAA catalysts. It has further delivered catalyst formulations that could address current inefficiencies in the catalyst industry and could result in large economic and environmental payoffs.

Homotopic Action_A Pathway to Convergent Diagrammatic Theories.jpg
23/06/2021

This work introduces a universal framework for formulating a physical system so that its diagrammatic expansion is guaranteed to converge. The idea is to replace the system by an artificial one that continuously transforms to the original when a transformation parameter is varied. This transformation, called homotopy, is otherwise largely arbitrary, which is used to render the resulting diagrammatic series convergent.

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